Spindle Fire

Spindle Fire by Lexa Hillyer is a YA re-imagining of sleeping beauty and is the first book in a new series. Half sisters Aurora and Isabelle are best friends and total opposites. Aurora is beautiful, sweet, heir to the Deluce throne and unable to speak or feel; Isabelle is the kings illegitimate daughter, head strong and without sight. They are closer than anyone and would do anything for each other.

One day a terrible curse separates the sisters and leaves Deluce at the mercy of an evil fairy with unimaginable powers. Aurora falls into a deep sleep and awakens in a magical world with a terrible mystery and a boy she feels a deep connection to. Isabelle is in a race against time to save her sister by finding her true love and true loves kiss, but Isabelle is unexpectedly drawn to Aurora’s arranged husband and the path they travel is dangerous.

Now Isabelle and Aurora must find their way back to each other and save their kingdom. Can they battle a sleeping curse and solve a mystery decades in the making? Can the bonds of sisterhood survive this separation and the changes bound to occur?

OK, so this book had a really interesting premise. I was really into this idea of half-sisters paralleling twin fairy sisters and having to sort out their story in order to save their own. There was magic and mystery and it was totally up my ally. But I just wasn’t wowed by the tale. I didn’t have to read it. It was interesting and unique but it was missing something that I can’t quite put my finger on.

One thing I did really like about Spindle Fire was the fairy tithes. This isn’t anything new with fairy stories but the way the tithes worked was really intriguing. I like how each of the fairies had their own specialized tithes and how it played into their characters. I also think these fairy tithes are going to play into the series moving forward and if so, I like the way it’s heading.

Holy abrupt ending batman! Seriously, here I am listening along and all of a sudden I hear Fiona Hardingham say that this has been a audio production by… Wahhh! That’s one way to get someone to read the sequel, even if they weren’t really into it.

Overall, this one gets three stars from me. I think the sequel might have more potential but this was was just OK for me.

That’s all for now!

-M-

A Court of Wings and Ruin

A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas is the third book in the ACOTAR series. This one picks up a few weeks after the disaster in Hybern where the Court of Dreams was injured, Feyre’s sisters turned into high fae and the high lady of the night court left her mate to spy on their enemies.

Now Feyre is back in the Spring Court, painting flowers and pretending to be a perfect all-but damaged lady of spring. When really, she is playing a dangerous game, gathering information on Tamlin and the kings invasion of Prythian. Feyre must walk a fine line all while war inches closer and closer to the people she loves.

Will Feyre be able to sabotage Hybern and it’s allies? Will she get out of Spring alive? Will the Court of Dreams survive the coming onslaught?

Hmmm what to say about this one? I loved ACOMAF so much, I read it three times and listened to the audio book once. But I do not see myself re-reading ACOWAR. It wasn’t bad, but I didn’t find myself as invested in it as I was the second book. In fact, I found myself feeling about ACOWAR the same way I felt about ACOTAR–not bad but not spectacular.

It’s funny, Maas has these fantastic gems within her series. Books that just cannot compare and I absolutely fall in love with her characters but I don’t always feel like the books are consistent. I’m still going to fangirl over ACOTAR regardless because I love the Court of Dreams so much!

If, in this series, we were only invested in Feyre and Rhys then this would have been a wonderful conclusion to their story. For those two, it was quite a satisfying end. But we aren’t just invested in Feyre and Rhys. We want to know what happens between Cassian and Nesta, Lucian and Elain, Mor, Azriel, Amren, even Tamlin and the other high lords. But we don’t and that’s what was really missing in this one. Even if we got a few chapters with a glimpse of whats to come for those characters, I would have been happy.

Normally, I don’t like when a series switches from one PoV to multi-PoV but in this case, I think it would have added a little something. I hope the future books do this because I really want to see some insight into other characters.

Overall, ACOWAR satisfied my thirst for more Feyre and Rhys but it will be hard to wait to get the missing pieces from the rest of our favorite characters tales. This one gets three stars from me.

That’s all for now!

-M-

A Crown of Wishes

A Crown of Wishes by Roshani Ghokshi is the “sequel” to The Star-Touched Queen. Every hundred years the otherworld throws the Tournament of Wishes, an ancient tournament full of terror and wonder, where the risks are real and the prize is a wish of unlimited possibilities.

This year two contestants from different kingdoms must work together to stay alive and save their homes. Princess Gauri has been banned from her home by her brother, a twisted ruler whose thirst for power overshadows the good of his people. Prince Vikram is at the mercy of his council and will only ever be a puppet king while his legitimacy is in question.

Gauri and Vikram must come together despite their differences to beat the odds and survive a world of monsters and dreams. Can they solve these death defying riddles before time runs out? And what happens when reluctant allies become more?

Ghokshi does it again, all but a little differently. Where The Star-Touched Queen was a magical journey to find oneself and to rescue true love, A Crown of Wishes is a magical race against time and a journey toward self discovery and fate. These sound the same but the two books felt pretty different. There is an urgency to The Star-Touched Queen that we don’t really get in this one. This isn’t a bad thing but it does change the feel of the narrative just a bit.

A Crown of Wishes focuses more on the characters and the character development than the magic and mystery of it’s predecessor. Where The Star-Touched Queen only really develops Maya’s character, we get three fully developed narratives in this one. Gauri and Vikram play off each other really well. Gauri is serious and tactical with her warrior mind, whereas Vikram is sure of himself, intelligent and sly. It makes for an interesting dynamic and pairing.

I just love this world Ghokshi created; it’s magical and real and it feels unique. Ghokshi tells us in this one that the otherworld will soon be closed off from the real world and I wonder if there will be one more book about this. I hope so and I hope we see more of Maya her beau and Gauri and Vikram working in tandem. That’d be awesome!

Overall, this one gets 4 stars from me. It was a good read but I didn’t fall in love with the romantic relationship as much as I did with Maya’s. Still worth a shot.

That’s all for now!

-M-

A Million Worlds With You

A Million Worlds With You by Claudia Gray is the final book in the Firebird trilogy. The fate of the multiverse rests in the hands of an eighteen-year-old artist, Marguerite Caine. Marguerite has been hunted by the Triad for her one-of-a-kind ability to be a perfect traveler and she has finally learned their endgame.

The Triad will stop at nothing to get back their version of Josie, even if it means destroying hundreds of universes to do so. Now Marguerite must hunt down Wicked, her evil Triad self, and stop her from killing every version of Marguerite and the worlds she inhabits.

With the help of her family and her broken soulmate, Paul, Marguerite must race across the multiverse to save her loved ones in every dimension. Can Marguerite keep her sanity when every jump puts her at deaths door? And throughout it all will Marguerite and Paul be able to keep each other safe and find their way back to each other when all is said and done?

This was a surprising end to a pretty good series. This book had twist after twist. I am not sure what I expected but I did not expect the intertwining threads that twisted together to form a book with so much more depth than I anticipated.  It’s nice when the final book in a series lives up to it’s story.

We also get some closer with the worlds that Marguerite visited and left… well a mess. We get to revisit some of our favorite universes and we get to see what happened after Marguerite left. This was a real treat because we really begin to feel for those universe’s characters and it was nice to see them again.

All of our characters develop more in this final book, not just Paul and Marguerite. We see Theo at his best and worst and the Kane’s even have their chance to shine. We also see good sides to some of our bad guys and this was an interesting parallel.

This book left me satisfied with the story as a whole. I listened to this whole series in audio and didn’t have a hard time following along at all. If you need a good long audiobook series, this would be a good one to go to. This book gets four stars from me and I think the series as a whole deserves four stars as well.

That’s all for now!

-M-

Spindle

Spindle by E.K. Johnston is the sequel to A Thousand Nights. Generations after the the Storyteller Queen drove the demon from her husband and saved the land by imbuing it with good magic, evil has once again reared it’s head and prepares to strike. The mountain prison holding the demons at bay is weakening and the kingdoms on either side are at risk.

When a princess, Little Rose, is born a powerful she-demon places a curse upon her and her people. For more than a decade the demon bides her time, waiting for Little Rose to mature and her body ripen for the taking. No one dares try to break the curse until a boy, one of the spinners exiled because of the curse, and his companions steal the princess away from the castle.

Now the curse is coming to a head and all may be lost if the curse is not broken and the demons sent back to their iron prison. Without the storyteller queen, will her heirs be able to follow in her footsteps and set their people free?

Spindle is ultimately a retelling of sleeping beauty–spindle, curse, thorns, kiss and all. This retelling is told from the perspective of the “prince” a poor boy, torn from his home by the deadly affects the curse has on anyone who risks spinning. Yashaa is his mother’s son and he was meant to be a royal spinner in his lords household. But the curse took that away from him and anger drives him to return to his lost kingdom no matter the price. But the princess isn’t what he expects and his path changes forever.

This was no A Thousand NightsA Thousand Nights was magical and intriguing, it held an air of mystery and the language was flowy and beautiful. Spindle wasn’t quite that. It was a fine tale but doesn’t live up to the writing and story of it’s predecessor. I think if this was a book on it’s own, not connected at all to A Thousand Nights, I would have expected less and liked it more.

The ending came close the the feel of A Thousand Nights but it was also sort of a let down because it didn’t really feel like it belonged with the narrative we’d spent 300+ pages reading. I also thought there were a lot of loose ends with the ending being what it was.

This wasn’t a bad read but I expected more. This one gets a lean three stars from me.

That’s all for now!

-M-

Ten Thousand Skies Above You

Ten Thousand Skies Above You by Claudia Gray is the second book in the Firebird series. In this one we pick up a few months after Marguerite chased, who she thought was her father’s murder, through the multiverse and fell in love with her soul mate. Ever since first using the Firebird, Marguerite–a perfect traveler, has caught the eye of the Triad, an evil organisation who wants to use her and the Firebird technology for their own corrupt gains.

Now Marguerite is forced to play the Triad’s game in order to get back the love of her life, Paul, whose soul has been splintered into four pieces across multiple dimensions. Marguerite must complete several tasks before the Triad will reveal the locations of Paul’s soul.

With every world she visits, Marguerite is one step closer to saving her Paul and one step closer to losing him forever. Will Marguerite be able to put Paul back together again? And what will she do when she learns the Triad’s endgame?

This was a pretty good sequel for a three book series. We still get to see multiple dimensions and we get a lot more information on the Triad, which will be a big part of the final book. The series basically goes like this: Book 1 – set the stage, introduce us to the Firebird and the characters, and hint at conflict to come. Book 2 – our character relationships develop and we get that conflict that will lead up to a bigger event in the third book. Book 3 – I am hoping will be a final battle and a tie up of loose ends.

Once again, I enjoyed seeing the different possibilities; the different lives that the Kane family might have lived if they’d made different choices. From the drastic to the not so drastic, it makes you wonder how even the tiniest decisions could alter our lives completely.

Just like the first book this one does the science right. I have no idea if any of it is true but the book uses science to make the technology sound, sound and yet it is not overwhelming for the reader. It’s actually kind of interesting to hear some of the theories, which is a nice way to get non-science-y types into the science.

Marguerite seems a bit naive to me. She understands the the multiverse is an infinite number of worlds, alternate to their own, that might have little difference or might have big ones. And yet she is honestly shocked to find darker versions of Paul. She believes that the soul is the same in every world, regardless of the different upbringing and circumstances. But she seems distraught to learn that Paul’s goodness doesn’t shine through in every universe. This just seems a little silly to me because in infinite possibilities, of course there will be those you don’t like. She comes around at the end but after all her “we’re meant to be in any universe,” sudden doubts that lead her to run away doesn’t seem completely in character for her.

Overall this one gets 3 stars from me. It was middle of the road for me but still a series I am enjoying.

That’s all for now!

-M-

Blood Rose Rebellion

Blood Rose Rebellion by Rosalyn Eves is the first book in a new YA fantasy series set in 19th century London and Hungary. Sixteen-year-old Anna Arden is an outcast of Luminate society; she hold no magic in a society where magic is a symbol of class and proves your Luminate bloodline.

Anna would give anything for even a drop of magic but instead magic tends to go haywire in her presence. Which is how Anna finds herself exiled to a small estate in her families native Hungary. Anna travels to Hungary with her grandmother and their meets her quiet uncle and two cousins she has little in common with.

In Hungary Anna learns more about the society she longs to belong to and these revelations confuse and frighten her. She is no longer sure what she wants, nor what is right. Discontent is sweeping the land and Anna seems to fall straight into the Romani conflict and the Hungarian rebellion.

I’m not going to lie, I felt pretty lackluster about this one. There have been a couple of these lately, that have really interesting magical premises but don’t really deliver. I felt the same way about A Shadow Bright and Burning not long ago. A book that is totally up my ally but just doesn’t quite deliver.

I was pretty bored throughout this one. I didn’t really believe Anna as a character; her convictions were so gung-ho one minute but in the same sentence she talk about needing society and finding acceptance in her world. She was a little wishy-washy and a lot of her actions weren’t always believable for the time period she was supposed to be living in–magic or not.

One thing I did enjoy reading about in this book was the authors take on the political upheaval in Austria-Hungary at the time and the Romani culture. The magic weaved into this, very loosely based, historical time period was interesting. Setting the book during this time period was probably the books one merit.

I don’t know, I guess I just don’t have much to say about this one, which should tell you something. It passed the time but I’m not sure if I can bring myself to read the sequel when it comes out. This one gets two stars from me.

That’s all for now!

-M-